Upolu Island, Samoa


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When walking out of the arrivals terminal in Apia I saw someone standing there looking at me with a big smile. It was Frankie, an Irish who I had been traveling with earlier when island hopping in Fiji, Just randomly arriving in Samoa on the same flight as me.
Being two also meant that it would be cheaper and more sensible to rent a car, and so we did and started our journey around the Samoan Main Island, Upolu.
First stop on the way was the natural Sliding Rock right outside the capital, but as there was no water left there we were quick to continue to a waterfall where there was. Even though we were there at the end of the dry season everything was still green and the waterfall was like a cascade of running water that worked well as natural swimming pools. Just an half an hour away we did another swim. Even with a ten nzd entry fee it was well worth the privilege of swimming around as the only tourists on one of the many beaches that the South Coast of Samoa is known for.
Then we got to the most amazing places, which all people traveling to Samoa should see. First was two stunning Blue holes that were connected with a swim through cave tunnel which we also had all to ourselves. Second was the two kilometer coastal walk going along some spectacular cliffs, where we could see some natural tick tunnels, caves and blow hole cracks in the volcanic ground while constantly listening to powerful waves smashing towards the cliffs. Finishing off with a stay at the South East Coast backpacker “fales” (bungalows), where we could go snorkeling and pick our own mangoes was a good way to take in all the impressions that the island had given us.
As I was going to take the last bus to the airport leaving six hours before my flight I got in talk with a guy who asked me if I would not rather come to his home for supper and then let him drive me to the airport afterwards. I was quick to say yes and just an hour later I was sitting with his family who kept on trying to feed me like crazy and afterwards offering me all kinds of stuff they had laying around in their house. The only thing I was not allowed to refuse taking with me was a necklace that they would traditionally give to guests to show their appreciation, which to me felt like a symbol of the hospitality I have received here in Samoa.

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John praying for the meal he invited me for


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