Village life on Daugo Island, PNG


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Having stayed with my Couchsurfing host in Port Moresby for five days instead of the initial two that I had asked for I was feeling that it was time for me to leave. Hotels are very expensive here and camping in the city is far too dangerous. I had to improvise and went down to the harbour to ask a fisherman on my age if I could stay with his family for the rest of my days in PNG. He said that was fine as long as I could contribute in some way which I of course was fine with.
His wife had prepared a fish and coconut sauce dish for us when we arrived which was just amazingly good, just like all the food I was served there. One of the days they even served me a lobster for breakfast.
During the days I spent some time relaxing on the beach, I was shown how to skin a turtle, I helped out picking seagul eggs on the neighbor island and I was introduced to pretty much everyone in the small village. When walking around everyone knew my pidgin name (“Danis”) and greeted me as I walked by. In the nights I helped out with spearfishing by shedding light on the biggest fish I could see so that they could dive down and spear them and then to signal to the boat to come over when fish was caught. Whenever I turned off the light the water around us was lit up by thousands of biolumicent plankton, like stars lighting up the sky. The whole six hours fishing in the night was a magical moment for me.
During my whole stay in the village I was only offered the best they could give me. They were about 10 people sharing just a tiny floor surface so I had to sleep next to the whole spectrum of infants to grandparents, which was totally fine except that they fed their children candy and soda drinks at all times of the day so that the children would run around and be really loud super late as well as early mornings. The reason for it was that they did not have running water and sweet food and drinks was about the only things sold on the island.
The evenings before fishing were spent smoking cigarettes and chewing beetlenut around a fire while telling each other about how life was in our own countries. Being grown up on an island and used to fishing and taking a boat to school myself, we found out that except for my host getting a family much earlier and making a bit less, our lives were alot alike on the opposite sides of the planet.
At the end of my stay I paid Laka the money I had left (a bit over a hundred dollars) for giving me a life changing experience and to try to help him out a bit. If you find yourself in Port Moresby I would reccommend getting in touch with Laka (details below) for a unique local experience and to be able to help contribute to the local community.

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My host Laka and his family. Email og text him on 79725942 if you would like to stay with him too.
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Lobster for breakfast one of the mornings


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